New recipes

Café Attitude: While Meat is Off the Menu, a Popular Berkeley Vegan Eatery Offers Bullsh*t on the Side

Café Attitude: While Meat is Off the Menu, a Popular Berkeley Vegan Eatery Offers Bullsh*t on the Side

Photo by Jocelyn Hsu

Cafe Gratitude spins vegan eats into classic comfort foods like meatloaf and cheesy nachos, named with kitschy “I AM” statements. Here are some alternative aphorisms that may better suit the dining experience.

I AM INCONVENIENT: Café Gratitude was nearly empty when my daughter and I arrived for lunch. After waiting several minutes to be acknowledged by the staff, I approached the manager for a table, only to be brusquely deferred to the hostess.

Photo by Jocelyn Hsu

I AM COMPENSATING: We were seated at the back of the dining room nearest the kitchen. The manager, now our server, stood behind me and told us the specials in an overly friendly manner. Contorted awkwardly to see her, I marveled at her sweet-n-sour demeanor as she poured us water from a bottle etched with the word “love.”

I AM HONEST: Seated with us were two women and a toddler, which designated ours “the kiddie table.” Their conversation was far from family-friendly, however. “I’m really not that into him,” turned into, “We f**ked last night” and so forth. Perhaps, “I AM UNSURE” spring rolls would have been more apropos on the menu than “I AM FULFILLED” salad.

I AM HUNGRY: After a long wait, my food arrived. This food was so good it could’ve sold itself. I had no need to declare, “I AM GROUNDED” to feel the wholesomeness of my potatoes or their soothing effect on my disposition.

Photo Courtesy of Cafe Gratitude

I AM UNSUSTAINABLE: Condiments were served in plastic cups, and leftovers were packaged in waxed boxes. An excessive amount of paper products, complete with a custom-printed bag, were used to send me home with a small bed of lettuce and tubers.

I AM ACCEPTING | Photo by Jocelyn Hsu

I AM EXPENSIVE: Café Gratitude’s bottom line arrived with the bill. While Gratitude offered seasonal food with extraordinary flavor, I spent double what I would have at a conventional restaurant. Next time, I AM EATING ELSEWHERE.

The post Café Attitude: While Meat is Off the Menu, a Popular Berkeley Vegan Eatery Offers Bullsh*t on the Side originally appeared on Spoon University. Please visit Spoon University to see more posts like this one.


Café Attitude: While Meat is Off the Menu, a Popular Berkeley Vegan Eatery Offers Bullsh*t on the Side - Recipes

Local, seasonal, farmers market-driven restaurants have swept the nation in the last decade. But it’s no surprise that San Francisco chefs still outdo the rest when it comes to dedication to product. With mentors like Daniel Patterson and David Kinch training a new guard of chefs, along with some of the best produce, artisanal products, and ingredients in the country, there’s no better place to taste the terroir of a dish than one of San Francisco’s top restaurants.

Sustainability is law in this city, literally: composting is mandatory and using refurbished woods, metals, and other building materials is pretty much expected. Chefs like Gather’s Sean Baker are working with dedicated farms to grow heirloom and uncommon products others, like Haven’s Kim Alter, grow herbs and lettuces in whatever space their restaurant affords, including next-door gardens and rooftops and with such a verdant landscape, chefs like Commonwealth’s Jason Fox and Manresa’s Jessica Largey often forage for mushrooms, herbs, and greens on their days off.

That’s not to say San Francisco chefs are only focused on the what—they care about how they’re serving, too, with a focus on how to present the products in a completely individual way. As many explain it, they’re putting their “soul on the plate.” Following suit with the relaxed San Francisco restaurant feel, we’ve seen a shift away from haute cuisine and a big push to create something that represents the chef or bartender entirely. From Nick Balla’s move toward Eastern European flavors at Bar Tartine to the Trick Dog team’s fun approach to high concept drinks, the market is full of posh, yet casual restaurants and bars.

For those who’d like a taste of that cheffy soul, prepare yourself for our favorite 60 (or so) recently tasted San Francisco restaurants and bars.


Café Attitude: While Meat is Off the Menu, a Popular Berkeley Vegan Eatery Offers Bullsh*t on the Side - Recipes

Local, seasonal, farmers market-driven restaurants have swept the nation in the last decade. But it’s no surprise that San Francisco chefs still outdo the rest when it comes to dedication to product. With mentors like Daniel Patterson and David Kinch training a new guard of chefs, along with some of the best produce, artisanal products, and ingredients in the country, there’s no better place to taste the terroir of a dish than one of San Francisco’s top restaurants.

Sustainability is law in this city, literally: composting is mandatory and using refurbished woods, metals, and other building materials is pretty much expected. Chefs like Gather’s Sean Baker are working with dedicated farms to grow heirloom and uncommon products others, like Haven’s Kim Alter, grow herbs and lettuces in whatever space their restaurant affords, including next-door gardens and rooftops and with such a verdant landscape, chefs like Commonwealth’s Jason Fox and Manresa’s Jessica Largey often forage for mushrooms, herbs, and greens on their days off.

That’s not to say San Francisco chefs are only focused on the what—they care about how they’re serving, too, with a focus on how to present the products in a completely individual way. As many explain it, they’re putting their “soul on the plate.” Following suit with the relaxed San Francisco restaurant feel, we’ve seen a shift away from haute cuisine and a big push to create something that represents the chef or bartender entirely. From Nick Balla’s move toward Eastern European flavors at Bar Tartine to the Trick Dog team’s fun approach to high concept drinks, the market is full of posh, yet casual restaurants and bars.

For those who’d like a taste of that cheffy soul, prepare yourself for our favorite 60 (or so) recently tasted San Francisco restaurants and bars.


Café Attitude: While Meat is Off the Menu, a Popular Berkeley Vegan Eatery Offers Bullsh*t on the Side - Recipes

Local, seasonal, farmers market-driven restaurants have swept the nation in the last decade. But it’s no surprise that San Francisco chefs still outdo the rest when it comes to dedication to product. With mentors like Daniel Patterson and David Kinch training a new guard of chefs, along with some of the best produce, artisanal products, and ingredients in the country, there’s no better place to taste the terroir of a dish than one of San Francisco’s top restaurants.

Sustainability is law in this city, literally: composting is mandatory and using refurbished woods, metals, and other building materials is pretty much expected. Chefs like Gather’s Sean Baker are working with dedicated farms to grow heirloom and uncommon products others, like Haven’s Kim Alter, grow herbs and lettuces in whatever space their restaurant affords, including next-door gardens and rooftops and with such a verdant landscape, chefs like Commonwealth’s Jason Fox and Manresa’s Jessica Largey often forage for mushrooms, herbs, and greens on their days off.

That’s not to say San Francisco chefs are only focused on the what—they care about how they’re serving, too, with a focus on how to present the products in a completely individual way. As many explain it, they’re putting their “soul on the plate.” Following suit with the relaxed San Francisco restaurant feel, we’ve seen a shift away from haute cuisine and a big push to create something that represents the chef or bartender entirely. From Nick Balla’s move toward Eastern European flavors at Bar Tartine to the Trick Dog team’s fun approach to high concept drinks, the market is full of posh, yet casual restaurants and bars.

For those who’d like a taste of that cheffy soul, prepare yourself for our favorite 60 (or so) recently tasted San Francisco restaurants and bars.


Café Attitude: While Meat is Off the Menu, a Popular Berkeley Vegan Eatery Offers Bullsh*t on the Side - Recipes

Local, seasonal, farmers market-driven restaurants have swept the nation in the last decade. But it’s no surprise that San Francisco chefs still outdo the rest when it comes to dedication to product. With mentors like Daniel Patterson and David Kinch training a new guard of chefs, along with some of the best produce, artisanal products, and ingredients in the country, there’s no better place to taste the terroir of a dish than one of San Francisco’s top restaurants.

Sustainability is law in this city, literally: composting is mandatory and using refurbished woods, metals, and other building materials is pretty much expected. Chefs like Gather’s Sean Baker are working with dedicated farms to grow heirloom and uncommon products others, like Haven’s Kim Alter, grow herbs and lettuces in whatever space their restaurant affords, including next-door gardens and rooftops and with such a verdant landscape, chefs like Commonwealth’s Jason Fox and Manresa’s Jessica Largey often forage for mushrooms, herbs, and greens on their days off.

That’s not to say San Francisco chefs are only focused on the what—they care about how they’re serving, too, with a focus on how to present the products in a completely individual way. As many explain it, they’re putting their “soul on the plate.” Following suit with the relaxed San Francisco restaurant feel, we’ve seen a shift away from haute cuisine and a big push to create something that represents the chef or bartender entirely. From Nick Balla’s move toward Eastern European flavors at Bar Tartine to the Trick Dog team’s fun approach to high concept drinks, the market is full of posh, yet casual restaurants and bars.

For those who’d like a taste of that cheffy soul, prepare yourself for our favorite 60 (or so) recently tasted San Francisco restaurants and bars.


Café Attitude: While Meat is Off the Menu, a Popular Berkeley Vegan Eatery Offers Bullsh*t on the Side - Recipes

Local, seasonal, farmers market-driven restaurants have swept the nation in the last decade. But it’s no surprise that San Francisco chefs still outdo the rest when it comes to dedication to product. With mentors like Daniel Patterson and David Kinch training a new guard of chefs, along with some of the best produce, artisanal products, and ingredients in the country, there’s no better place to taste the terroir of a dish than one of San Francisco’s top restaurants.

Sustainability is law in this city, literally: composting is mandatory and using refurbished woods, metals, and other building materials is pretty much expected. Chefs like Gather’s Sean Baker are working with dedicated farms to grow heirloom and uncommon products others, like Haven’s Kim Alter, grow herbs and lettuces in whatever space their restaurant affords, including next-door gardens and rooftops and with such a verdant landscape, chefs like Commonwealth’s Jason Fox and Manresa’s Jessica Largey often forage for mushrooms, herbs, and greens on their days off.

That’s not to say San Francisco chefs are only focused on the what—they care about how they’re serving, too, with a focus on how to present the products in a completely individual way. As many explain it, they’re putting their “soul on the plate.” Following suit with the relaxed San Francisco restaurant feel, we’ve seen a shift away from haute cuisine and a big push to create something that represents the chef or bartender entirely. From Nick Balla’s move toward Eastern European flavors at Bar Tartine to the Trick Dog team’s fun approach to high concept drinks, the market is full of posh, yet casual restaurants and bars.

For those who’d like a taste of that cheffy soul, prepare yourself for our favorite 60 (or so) recently tasted San Francisco restaurants and bars.


Café Attitude: While Meat is Off the Menu, a Popular Berkeley Vegan Eatery Offers Bullsh*t on the Side - Recipes

Local, seasonal, farmers market-driven restaurants have swept the nation in the last decade. But it’s no surprise that San Francisco chefs still outdo the rest when it comes to dedication to product. With mentors like Daniel Patterson and David Kinch training a new guard of chefs, along with some of the best produce, artisanal products, and ingredients in the country, there’s no better place to taste the terroir of a dish than one of San Francisco’s top restaurants.

Sustainability is law in this city, literally: composting is mandatory and using refurbished woods, metals, and other building materials is pretty much expected. Chefs like Gather’s Sean Baker are working with dedicated farms to grow heirloom and uncommon products others, like Haven’s Kim Alter, grow herbs and lettuces in whatever space their restaurant affords, including next-door gardens and rooftops and with such a verdant landscape, chefs like Commonwealth’s Jason Fox and Manresa’s Jessica Largey often forage for mushrooms, herbs, and greens on their days off.

That’s not to say San Francisco chefs are only focused on the what—they care about how they’re serving, too, with a focus on how to present the products in a completely individual way. As many explain it, they’re putting their “soul on the plate.” Following suit with the relaxed San Francisco restaurant feel, we’ve seen a shift away from haute cuisine and a big push to create something that represents the chef or bartender entirely. From Nick Balla’s move toward Eastern European flavors at Bar Tartine to the Trick Dog team’s fun approach to high concept drinks, the market is full of posh, yet casual restaurants and bars.

For those who’d like a taste of that cheffy soul, prepare yourself for our favorite 60 (or so) recently tasted San Francisco restaurants and bars.


Café Attitude: While Meat is Off the Menu, a Popular Berkeley Vegan Eatery Offers Bullsh*t on the Side - Recipes

Local, seasonal, farmers market-driven restaurants have swept the nation in the last decade. But it’s no surprise that San Francisco chefs still outdo the rest when it comes to dedication to product. With mentors like Daniel Patterson and David Kinch training a new guard of chefs, along with some of the best produce, artisanal products, and ingredients in the country, there’s no better place to taste the terroir of a dish than one of San Francisco’s top restaurants.

Sustainability is law in this city, literally: composting is mandatory and using refurbished woods, metals, and other building materials is pretty much expected. Chefs like Gather’s Sean Baker are working with dedicated farms to grow heirloom and uncommon products others, like Haven’s Kim Alter, grow herbs and lettuces in whatever space their restaurant affords, including next-door gardens and rooftops and with such a verdant landscape, chefs like Commonwealth’s Jason Fox and Manresa’s Jessica Largey often forage for mushrooms, herbs, and greens on their days off.

That’s not to say San Francisco chefs are only focused on the what—they care about how they’re serving, too, with a focus on how to present the products in a completely individual way. As many explain it, they’re putting their “soul on the plate.” Following suit with the relaxed San Francisco restaurant feel, we’ve seen a shift away from haute cuisine and a big push to create something that represents the chef or bartender entirely. From Nick Balla’s move toward Eastern European flavors at Bar Tartine to the Trick Dog team’s fun approach to high concept drinks, the market is full of posh, yet casual restaurants and bars.

For those who’d like a taste of that cheffy soul, prepare yourself for our favorite 60 (or so) recently tasted San Francisco restaurants and bars.


Café Attitude: While Meat is Off the Menu, a Popular Berkeley Vegan Eatery Offers Bullsh*t on the Side - Recipes

Local, seasonal, farmers market-driven restaurants have swept the nation in the last decade. But it’s no surprise that San Francisco chefs still outdo the rest when it comes to dedication to product. With mentors like Daniel Patterson and David Kinch training a new guard of chefs, along with some of the best produce, artisanal products, and ingredients in the country, there’s no better place to taste the terroir of a dish than one of San Francisco’s top restaurants.

Sustainability is law in this city, literally: composting is mandatory and using refurbished woods, metals, and other building materials is pretty much expected. Chefs like Gather’s Sean Baker are working with dedicated farms to grow heirloom and uncommon products others, like Haven’s Kim Alter, grow herbs and lettuces in whatever space their restaurant affords, including next-door gardens and rooftops and with such a verdant landscape, chefs like Commonwealth’s Jason Fox and Manresa’s Jessica Largey often forage for mushrooms, herbs, and greens on their days off.

That’s not to say San Francisco chefs are only focused on the what—they care about how they’re serving, too, with a focus on how to present the products in a completely individual way. As many explain it, they’re putting their “soul on the plate.” Following suit with the relaxed San Francisco restaurant feel, we’ve seen a shift away from haute cuisine and a big push to create something that represents the chef or bartender entirely. From Nick Balla’s move toward Eastern European flavors at Bar Tartine to the Trick Dog team’s fun approach to high concept drinks, the market is full of posh, yet casual restaurants and bars.

For those who’d like a taste of that cheffy soul, prepare yourself for our favorite 60 (or so) recently tasted San Francisco restaurants and bars.


Café Attitude: While Meat is Off the Menu, a Popular Berkeley Vegan Eatery Offers Bullsh*t on the Side - Recipes

Local, seasonal, farmers market-driven restaurants have swept the nation in the last decade. But it’s no surprise that San Francisco chefs still outdo the rest when it comes to dedication to product. With mentors like Daniel Patterson and David Kinch training a new guard of chefs, along with some of the best produce, artisanal products, and ingredients in the country, there’s no better place to taste the terroir of a dish than one of San Francisco’s top restaurants.

Sustainability is law in this city, literally: composting is mandatory and using refurbished woods, metals, and other building materials is pretty much expected. Chefs like Gather’s Sean Baker are working with dedicated farms to grow heirloom and uncommon products others, like Haven’s Kim Alter, grow herbs and lettuces in whatever space their restaurant affords, including next-door gardens and rooftops and with such a verdant landscape, chefs like Commonwealth’s Jason Fox and Manresa’s Jessica Largey often forage for mushrooms, herbs, and greens on their days off.

That’s not to say San Francisco chefs are only focused on the what—they care about how they’re serving, too, with a focus on how to present the products in a completely individual way. As many explain it, they’re putting their “soul on the plate.” Following suit with the relaxed San Francisco restaurant feel, we’ve seen a shift away from haute cuisine and a big push to create something that represents the chef or bartender entirely. From Nick Balla’s move toward Eastern European flavors at Bar Tartine to the Trick Dog team’s fun approach to high concept drinks, the market is full of posh, yet casual restaurants and bars.

For those who’d like a taste of that cheffy soul, prepare yourself for our favorite 60 (or so) recently tasted San Francisco restaurants and bars.


Café Attitude: While Meat is Off the Menu, a Popular Berkeley Vegan Eatery Offers Bullsh*t on the Side - Recipes

Local, seasonal, farmers market-driven restaurants have swept the nation in the last decade. But it’s no surprise that San Francisco chefs still outdo the rest when it comes to dedication to product. With mentors like Daniel Patterson and David Kinch training a new guard of chefs, along with some of the best produce, artisanal products, and ingredients in the country, there’s no better place to taste the terroir of a dish than one of San Francisco’s top restaurants.

Sustainability is law in this city, literally: composting is mandatory and using refurbished woods, metals, and other building materials is pretty much expected. Chefs like Gather’s Sean Baker are working with dedicated farms to grow heirloom and uncommon products others, like Haven’s Kim Alter, grow herbs and lettuces in whatever space their restaurant affords, including next-door gardens and rooftops and with such a verdant landscape, chefs like Commonwealth’s Jason Fox and Manresa’s Jessica Largey often forage for mushrooms, herbs, and greens on their days off.

That’s not to say San Francisco chefs are only focused on the what—they care about how they’re serving, too, with a focus on how to present the products in a completely individual way. As many explain it, they’re putting their “soul on the plate.” Following suit with the relaxed San Francisco restaurant feel, we’ve seen a shift away from haute cuisine and a big push to create something that represents the chef or bartender entirely. From Nick Balla’s move toward Eastern European flavors at Bar Tartine to the Trick Dog team’s fun approach to high concept drinks, the market is full of posh, yet casual restaurants and bars.

For those who’d like a taste of that cheffy soul, prepare yourself for our favorite 60 (or so) recently tasted San Francisco restaurants and bars.